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Emotional Intelligence Science And Myth Pdf

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The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence

Some of the greatest moments in human history were fueled by emotional intelligence. When Martin Luther King, Jr. Delivering this electrifying message required emotional intelligence—the ability to recognize, understand, and manage emotions. King demonstrated remarkable skill in managing his own emotions and in sparking emotions that moved his audience to action. His tone of pained indignation matched that note for note.

Recognizing the power of emotions, another one of the most influential leaders of the 20th century spent years studying the emotional effects of his body language.

As a result, emotional intelligence is now taught widely in secondary schools, business schools, and medical schools. Emotional intelligence is important, but the unbridled enthusiasm has obscured a dark side. New evidence shows that when people hone their emotional skills, they become better at manipulating others.

When you know what others are feeling, you can tug at their heartstrings and motivate them to act against their own best interests. Social scientists have begun to document this dark side of emotional intelligence. In emerging research led by University of Cambridge professor Jochen Menges, when a leader gave an inspiring speech filled with emotion, the audience was less likely to scrutinize the message and remembered less of the content.

Ironically, audience members were so moved by the speech that they claimed to recall more of it. The authors call this the awestruck effect, but it might just as easily be described as the dumbstruck effect. Leaders who master emotions can rob us of our capacities to reason.

If their values are out of step with our own, the results can be devastating. New evidence suggests that when people have self-serving motives, emotional intelligence becomes a weapon for manipulating others. The employees who engaged in the most harmful behaviors were Machiavellians with high emotional intelligence.

They used their emotional skills to demean and embarrass their peers for personal gain. Shining a light on this dark side of emotional intelligence is one mission of a research team led by University College London professor Martin Kilduff. According to these experts, emotional intelligence helps people disguise one set of emotions while expressing another for personal gain. More often than not, emotional skills are simply instrumental tools for goal accomplishment.

In a study of emotions at the Body Shop, a research team led by Stanford professor Joanne Martin discovered that founder Anita Roddick leveraged emotions to inspire her employees to fundraise for charity.

Walking that tightrope is no easy task. Recently, psychologists Dana Joseph of the University of Central Florida and Daniel Newman of the University of Illinois comprehensively analyzed every study that has ever examined the link between emotional intelligence and job performance.

In jobs that required extensive attention to emotions, higher emotional intelligence translated into better performance. Salespeople, real-estate agents, call-center representatives, and counselors all excelled at their jobs when they knew how to read and regulate emotions—they were able to deal more effectively with stressful situations and provide service with a smile. However, in jobs that involved fewer emotional demands, the results reversed.

The more emotionally intelligent employees were, the lower their job performance. For mechanics, scientists, and accountants, emotional intelligence was a liability rather than an asset. Although more research is needed to unpack these results, one promising explanation is that these employees were paying attention to emotions when they should have been focusing on their tasks. If your job is to analyze data or repair cars, it can be quite distracting to read the facial expressions, vocal tones, and body languages of the people around you.

Instead of assuming that emotional intelligence is always useful, we need to think more carefully about where and when it matters. In a recent study at a healthcare company, I asked employees to complete a test about managing and regulating emotions, and then asked managers to evaluate how much time employees spent helping their colleagues and customers. There was no relationship whatsoever between emotional intelligence and helping: Helping is driven by our motivations and values, not by our abilities to understand and manage emotions.

However, emotional intelligence was consequential when examining a different behavior: challenging the status quo by speaking up with ideas and suggestions for improvement. Emotionally intelligent employees spoke up more often and more effectively. When colleagues were treated unjustly, they felt the righteous indignation to speak up, but were able to keep their anger in check and reason with their colleagues. When they went out on a limb to advocate for gender equity, emotional intelligence helped them keep their fear at bay.

When they brought ideas for innovation to senior leaders, their ability to express enthusiasm helped them avoid threatening leaders. On a much smaller scale, they were able to follow Martin Luther King Jr. More than two decades have passed since psychologists Peter Salovey at Yale and John Mayer at the University of New Hampshire introduced the concept of emotional intelligence in Why has it taken us so long to develop a more nuanced view? After Daniel Goleman popularized the idea in , many researchers—perhaps awestruck themselves by enthusiasm for the concept of emotional intelligence—proceeded to conduct studies that were fatally flawed.

Thanks to more rigorous research methods, there is growing recognition that emotional intelligence—like any skill—can be used for good or evil. Skip to content Site Navigation The Atlantic.

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Emotional Intelligence: Science and Myth

Richard D. Emotional intelligence EI is one of the most widely discussed topics in current psychology. Although first mentioned in the professional literature nearly two decades ago, in the past five years it has received extensive media attention. The term "emotional intelligence" refers to the ability to identify, express, and understand emotions; to assimilate emotions into thought; and to regulate both positive and negative emotions in oneself and others. Yet despite the flourishing research programs and broad popular interest, scientific evidence for a clearly identified construct of EI is sparse. It remains to be seen whether there is anything to EI that researchers in the fields of personality, intelligence, and applied psychology do not already know. This book offers a comprehensive critical review of EI.

Some of the greatest moments in human history were fueled by emotional intelligence. When Martin Luther King, Jr. Delivering this electrifying message required emotional intelligence—the ability to recognize, understand, and manage emotions. King demonstrated remarkable skill in managing his own emotions and in sparking emotions that moved his audience to action. His tone of pained indignation matched that note for note.


Request PDF | On Jan 30, , Matthews and others published Emotional Intelligence: Science and Myth | Find, read and cite all the research.


Emotional Intelligence: The Hype, the Hope, the Evidence

As a departure from past research on emotional intelligence EI , which generally examines the influence of an individual's level of EI on that individual's consequences, we examined relationships between the emotional intelligence EI of both members of dyads involved in a negotiation in order to explain objective and subjective outcomes. As expected, individuals high in EI reported a more positive experience. However, surprisingly, such individuals also achieved significantly lower objective scores than their counterparts.

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Emotional Deception

National Library of Australia. Search the catalogue for collection items held by the National Library of Australia. Matthews, Gerald. Emotional intelligence : science and myth. Although first mentioned in the professionals literature nearly two decades ago, in the past five years it has received extensive media attention. The term "emotional intelligence" refers to the ability to identify, express, and understand emotions; to assimilate emotions into thought; and to regulate both positive and negative emotions in oneself and others.

Emotional intelligence EI is one of the most widely discussed topics in current psychology. Although first mentioned in the professional literature nearly two decades ago, in the past five years it has received extensive media attention. The term "emotional intelligence" refers to the ability to identify, express, and understand emotions; to assimilate emotions into thought; and to regulate both positive and negative emotions in oneself and others. Yet despite the flourishing research programs and broad popular interest, scientific evidence for a clearly identified construct of EI is sparse. It remains to be seen whether there is anything to EI that researchers in the fields of personality, intelligence, and applied psychology do not already know. This book offers a comprehensive critical review of EI.

At the outset, I thought that the ideas and research programs around these alternative notions of intelligence, and particularly in EI, were laudable and done with good intent. Yet, when I left Yale, I left as a skeptic. Although more than 20 years have passed since the publication of this seminal piece, the scientific credentials of EI are still very much in question. There are three major issues concerning the EI construct:. I will address each of the three points in more detail below. But let me first lay my conclusion on the table: I am very doubtful that emotional intelligence as currently theorized and measured is a valid scientific construct Antonakis, , , ; there are theoretical and empirical reasons for my positions. I return to the theoretical issues at the end of this article and focus here on the empirical ones.


Request PDF | On Jan 1, , Gerald Matthews and others published Emotional Intelligence: Science and Myth | Find, read and cite all the.


EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND NEGOTIATION: THE TENSION BETWEEN CREATING AND CLAIMING VALUE

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Emotional Deception.

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