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Dilemmas And Contradictions Of Ethnic Pluralism In America Stephen Steinberg Pdf

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Multicultural education is a set of educational strategies developed to assist teachers when responding to the rapidly changing demographics of their students.

Chapter 14 – Inequality as a Challenge to Democracy

Democracy, as we understand it, is a process of collective decision making among persons, which issues in collectively binding norms for the society of those persons. It is a process of decision making in which persons participate as equals in determining the legal and conventional norms that bind them and in which the group of persons, taken collectively, are sovereign. Democracy can be understood as a descriptive term, referring to political societies that actually exist, or as a normative ideal for the evaluation of political societies.

This chapter is primarily about the basic moral principles that can justify this egalitarian process of collective decision making and on the challenges to understanding and realizing this ideal in the modern world.

Challenges to articulating and implementing the democratic principle arise due to the reality of economic inequality, to the religious, ethnic, gender and racial pluralism of modern societies, and to the fact that these societies are part of a larger global society. We discuss and evaluate the appropriateness of democratic institutions, procedures, and organizations to translate the moral principles into the structural grammar of present day democracies and to what extent they can guarantee the fundamental principles and normative promises of democracy.

The ideas of equality and sovereignty at the base of democracy cannot be fully appreciated without a grasp of the pluralism and complexity of modern societies.

We take public equality as the basic normative principle underwriting democracy and guiding our efforts to understand the challenges that democracy faces.

The principle helps us think about democracy along two distinct dimensions: procedural and substantive. Democracy is grounded in the principle of equality in the sense that because persons have equal status and worth, the collective decision making process is meant to realize the equal advancement of the interests of the members of the society.

The ideal of democracy is a uniquely public realization of the equal status and worth of each citizen in the sense that all can see that they are treated as equals despite all the disagreements and conflicts of interest that arise in modern societies.

Democracy achieves this by giving people an equal say in the making of collectively binding decisions and by protecting basic civil rights. This equal say involves equality in capacities to deliberate with fellow citizens and equal voting power and capacities to negotiate when disagreements persist. The challenge is to extend and deepen this idea in the context of highly pluralistic societies and beyond the state. The principle of public equality also grounds the fundamental civil rights of persons as well.

There are certain basic civil and liberal rights whose respect and protection are as important to the public realization of the equal status and worth of persons as democracy itself is. And these rights must be respected and protected by democratic decision making just as much as democracy itself if persons are to be treated publicly as equals. This substantive dimension of public equality is also a source of debate and contention.

At the same time, the idea of equality at the heart of democracy is itself a contested notion. And the challenges we address in the subsequent parts of this chapter bring out some of the main sources of contestation. And so the ideal of public equality itself must be subject to continual discussion and revision.

In this sense, democracy is an ideal that is never fully realized among persons. We have structured the chapter along fundamental challenges democracy is facing in the 21st century. These challenges are: socioeconomic inequality , gender inequality, religious inequality, racial inequality, generational inequality, racial inequality, globalization as an external threat to public equality, populism as an increasingly powerful challenge within the OECD world, and the risk that the principal of democracy, the demos is withering away.

These single subchapters focus particularly on the challenges to democracy, but they also provide some responses to them. The second part of the chapter changes the focus insofar as it deals mainly with responses such as democratic innovations in Europe and Latin America as specific answers to the shortcomings of representative democracy.

We also address the question of which democratic norms should guide the procedures of supranational governance and what science can contribute to solving some of the challenges science itself and democracy are facing. In order to allow a democratic space with the vision of an ever expanding project, both the demos and equality need to be at the core of democracy.

In our world, the state is still the more likely arena for materializing political rights. In a post-national constellation, constitutional-patriotism is too thin and populism-as-fundamentalism is all too dangerous.

To go beyond the nation should not mean to abandon the demos; multi-ethnic in its nature hence remote from organic nationalism, and moving towards greater human rights on international scale as a regulative norm, the evolving, equality-striving demos as a creation of democratic states is a guiding principle of humanism.

It is therefore still a viable route to claim a civic demos at the heart of democratic polity as the main institutional design to embed political equality. Our focus in this chapter is primarily on the basic moral principles that can justify this egalitarian process of collective decision making and on the challenges to understanding and realizing this ideal in the modern world.

After an initial account of the basic principle we will address the challenges to articulating and implementing this principle that arise due to the reality of economic inequality in these societies, to the religious, ethnic, gender and racial pluralism of modern societies, and to the fact that these societies are part of a larger global society.

At this point we discuss and evaluate the appropriateness of democratic institutions, procedures, and organizations to translate the moral principles into the structural grammar of present day democracies and to what extent they can guarantee the fundamental principles and normative promises of democracy.

As we will see, the ideas of equality and sovereignty at the base of democracy cannot be fully appreciated without a grasp of the pluralism and complexity of modern societies. The work of this chapter is a collaborative project. The struggle of all groups and persons in society to be recognized as equal and valued members of society is the defining feature of democracy.

The reason why democracy has this special status is because it is a way of treating persons as equals in the context of a highly pluralistic society. It does this in the context of a lot of disagreement about how society should be organized and very strong conflicts of interests in how it should be organized. In these circumstances, the question arises as to who gets to decide on the collectively binding norms.

Under the assumption that persons and groups have only limited understandings of the interests and perspectives of other persons and groups, and persons and groups are generally biased in favor of their own interests and perspectives, it is important for all persons and groups to have a say in the collectively binding decisions that constitute the social and political order of a society. Each person and group brings their limited and partial perspectives on how society ought to be organized and attempts by means of argument and negotiation to reconcile their limited points of view with those of others.

Each thereby is able to stand up for his or her own interests and perspectives and is able to learn about the perspectives and interests of others. In this way the biases of each person are partly mitigated by a process of discussion and negotiation.

They are unlikely to reach full agreement on how to live together. And thus each is unlikely to be fully satisfied that the society is organized as it ought to be organized since the points of view and interests of many others will have to be accommodated.

It is not just important that all have a say but that each has an equal say. Only in this way can the issue of who decides be settled in a way that recognizes and affirms the equal status and value of all persons. So the ideal of public equality serves both as a standard for the evaluation of the procedural aspects of the democratic process as well as a principle for the assessment of the substantive outcomes of democracy.

The most obvious way in which it does this is that democratic societies must decide how to reproduce democracy themselves in their constitutional forms as well as in the social bases of democratic participation. In this respect the discussions of this chapter are designed to inform this continual process of reflection and reproduction of democracy.

We also address the question which democratic norms should guide the procedures of supranational governance and what can science contribute to solve some of the challenges science itself and democracy is facing. A concluding paragraph will summarize the chance for re-democratizing democracy. After three decades of neoliberal policies and increasing socio-economic equality the well-established democracies of the OECD world, Latin America and Asia are under stress.

The stress is not primarily caused by external factors such as the digital revolution and the endogenous evolution of capitalism but by democracies own choices. However, it is not entirely clear which root concepts of democracy these authors are using as normative standards for their fundamental critiques of real existing democracy. We will propose a concept of democracy that goes beyond a minimalist Schumpeterian understanding of democracy while also avoiding maximalist overstretching of the concept by incorporating output and outcomes into the proper definition of democracy.

In the following we will present:. If the external embedding is damaged or underdeveloped, this, too, can pose challenges for democracy. The notion of embedding is grounded in the system-theoretical logic of the interdependence of component parts. Critical changes in one partial regime can thus infect other partial regimes. To what extent this occurs depends above all on the intensity of the partial crisis, the resilience of each partial regime, and the functional proximity of one partial regime to another.

The major argument of this chapter is: the social and political disembedding of the external embeddedness driven not only but increasingly by socio-economic inequality tends to break up the internal embeddedness of contemporary democracy. Socio-economic, ethnic, religious or gender inequalities challenge political equality as a core principle of democracy and thereby the proper working of democracy.

The chapter and all the single contributions to it will show that most of these partial regimes are challenged by different sorts of inequality, however to a different degree. A democratic electoral regime requires universal voting rights, active and passive, as well as free and fair elections. These are necessary but far from sufficient conditions for a democratic system. In representative democracy, the electoral regime occupies a key position because elections are the most visible expression of popular sovereignty.

Those represented elect their representatives for a fixed period. Through this representative nexus, the addressees of norms are able to see themselves as the authors of norms Kelsen This regime, therefore, is concerned above all with participation and representation. What is at issue is the interaction between voters, parties, political elites, and parliaments. Differing than formalist constitutionalist reasoning we consider not only the de jure equality of voting as essential for a working democracy, but also the societal and political conditions which provide the individual citizen with the cognitive and material resources of equal opportunity to make use of the constitutional right for voting.

The political rights of participation establish the unrestricted validity of the right to freedom of opinion and expression, as well as the rights to association, assembly, and petition. Political rights of participation constitute the public arena as an autonomous sphere for political action in which organizational and communicative power unfolds. In this sphere, collective processes of organization, opinion, and will-formation determine and underpin the competition for positions of political authority.

Here, too, it is about participation and representation, as well as about the vertical control of the representatives by the represented. The most important organized actors are political parties, but the domain also encompasses social protest movements, non-governmental organizations NGOs , interest groups, direct-democratic forms of participation such as referendums, deliberative civic forums, institutional access to the planning of major infrastructure projects, and participatory budgeting.

As it is the case for equal voting good societies have to provide the citizens with sufficient resources to participate in politics equally. Democratic elections and political participation need to be complemented by civil liberties. If one of them is weakened, this reduces the efficient functioning of the other; if one of them is strengthened, it reinforces the effectiveness of the other.

Cultural ethnical, religious, gender, sexuality and economic inequality challenge the de jure and even more the actual equality of civil rights. This is true not only for young and instable democracies but reaches deeply into the reality of OECD-democracies. The fourth partial regime consists in the constitutional provisions for horizontal checks and balances between institutions. These are concerned not only with governmental structures, but also regulate and monitor the legality of government actions.

Especially in times of crisis when the executive often claims special decision-making powers, a working horizontal accountability of powers is of elementary importance for the survival of democracy. In many young democracies the inequality of power between the executive on the one side and the legislative and the judiciary on the other side challenge the restrict the control of those who govern. The effective power to govern means that the only persons, organizations, and institutions entitled to make decisions binding on society are those directly legitimated in free elections or indirectly through delegation under constitutional law by constitutional bodies.

Governments and parliaments must have the resources and decision-making autonomy to prevent extra-constitutional actors from encroaching on their ability to govern. With economic globalization and the deregulation of financial markets in particular, actors with little or no democratic legitimation such as the International Monetary Fund IMF , the European Central Bank ECB , big banks, and hedge funds have been gaining worryingly high levels of influence over democratic processes.

The partial regimes described can fully realize their collectively democracy-reinforcing effect only if they are mutually embedded. Democracy is thus understood as an ensemble of partial regimes that both normatively and functionally interdependent complement and limit one another.

Each democracy is also embedded in an external environment that encircles it on the outside, either enabling and stabilizing or hampering and destabilizing it. The most important external embedding consists in the socioeconomic context, statehood, and the international or regional integration of a country in organizations, alliances, and policy regimes. The internal and external embedding has been eroded during the last decades. Particularly the socioeconomic environment and the progressing denationalization of economic police making have put democracy and particular stress.

However, we should not simply speak of a crisis of democracy since we can observe positive and negative developments. However, a closer look at the single partial regimes of democracy will show that the negative developments prevail.

Multicultural education

The book relies almost entirely on preexisting research, much of which had sparked little controversy when it first appeared, as well as rather conventionally derived sets of demographic and socioeconomic data. Moreover, one of its most controversial positions—that black ghetto populations were stricken by a set of problems linked to debilitating patterns of behavior and family instabilities—had been a fixture of urban policy discourse since the publication of the Moynihan Report in This was a line of reasoning, many argued, that placed the blame for ghetto poverty on underclass blacks themselves rather than the forces of institutional racism that maintained the ghettos they lived in. Amplifying the potency of such messages, moreover, was the rather striking embrace of the book and its author by the academic establishment. Indeed, despite its largely derivative and inarguably modest scholarly labor, the American Sociological Association awarded TDSR its prestigious Sydney Spivack Award, thereby setting its author on the road to fame, power, and, by the standards of the academic profession, fortune. Shortly after the publication in of his next and no less pithily titled book, The Truly Disadvantaged , which sought to deepen the analysis of the ghetto underclass elaborated in TDSR and outline its policy implications, Wilson received the top honor available to scholars—the coveted and lucrative MacArthur Fellowship.

Democracy, as we understand it, is a process of collective decision making among persons, which issues in collectively binding norms for the society of those persons. It is a process of decision making in which persons participate as equals in determining the legal and conventional norms that bind them and in which the group of persons, taken collectively, are sovereign. Democracy can be understood as a descriptive term, referring to political societies that actually exist, or as a normative ideal for the evaluation of political societies. This chapter is primarily about the basic moral principles that can justify this egalitarian process of collective decision making and on the challenges to understanding and realizing this ideal in the modern world. Challenges to articulating and implementing the democratic principle arise due to the reality of economic inequality, to the religious, ethnic, gender and racial pluralism of modern societies, and to the fact that these societies are part of a larger global society. We discuss and evaluate the appropriateness of democratic institutions, procedures, and organizations to translate the moral principles into the structural grammar of present day democracies and to what extent they can guarantee the fundamental principles and normative promises of democracy. The ideas of equality and sovereignty at the base of democracy cannot be fully appreciated without a grasp of the pluralism and complexity of modern societies.


*A study of American racial, ethnic, and religious groups; their historical Steinberg, Stephen. Steinberg, Chapter 10 “Dilemmas & Contradictions of Ethnic Pluralism in elizabethsid.org​chappdf.


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I n a quiet office at a Washington think tank, a tract is composed on the biologically determined intellectual inferiority of blacks. Out on a Brooklyn street, as black demonstrators march through a segregated white enclave, the residents yell racist epithets. At an urban college campus in California, Latinos and Asians, whites and blacks, sit side-by-side in the overcrowded classroom, and in their own separate groups in the cafeteria.

Language: English French Spanish. US sociology has been historically segregated in that, at least until the s, there were two distinct institutionally organized traditions of sociological thought — one black and one white. For the most part, however, dominant historiographies have been silent on that segregation and, at best, reproduce it when addressing the US sociological tradition. This article addresses the absence of African American sociologists from the US sociological canon and, further, discusses the implications of this absence for our understanding of core sociological concepts.

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Prudence L. Previous literature has failed to empirically demonstrate the conceptual distinction that social scientists make between "dominant" and "non-dominant" cultural capital. This article provides evidence of the coexistence of these two forms of capital within the social and academic lives of poor ethnic minority students. Using in-depth interviews with 44 low-income African American youth, I illustrate how these students negotiate their perceptions of the differential values placed by educators on these two forms of capital. Often, scholars research the effects of dominant cultural capital in social reproduction across various social classes, but not the influence of non-dominant cultural capital on status relations within socially marginalized communities. By taking into account the interplay between these two forms of capital in the lives of low-income minority students, researchers might develop a more complete and nuanced understanding of how culture ultimately affects the prospects of mobility for lower status social groups. Most users should sign in with their email address.

Халохот оценил расстояние до входа. Семь ступеней. Он мысленно прорепетировал предстоящее убийство. Если у входа на площадку взять вправо, можно увидеть самый дальний левый угол площадки, даже еще не выйдя на. Если Беккер окажется там, Халохот сразу же выстрелит. Если нет, он войдет и будет двигаться на восток, держа в поле зрения правый угол, единственное место, где мог находиться Беккер. Он улыбнулся.

 Вы сказали, что он приходил. Беккер услышал, как его собеседница листает книгу заказов. Там не окажется никакого Клауса, но Беккер понимал, что клиенты далеко не всегда указывают свои подлинные имена. - Хм-м, извините, - произнесла женщина.  - Не нахожу .


less populations in the United States, Native American res- ervations, and itance to connect cultural diversity with issues of poverty and inequality. For one.


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Оба они - Хейл и Сьюзан - даже подпрыгнули от неожиданности. Это был Чатрукьян. Он снова постучал. У него был такой вид, будто он только что увидел Армагеддон. Хейл сердито посмотрел на обезумевшего сотрудника лаборатории систем безопасности и обратился к Сьюзан: - Я сейчас вернусь. Выпей воды.

 Абсурд! - отрезал Джабба.  - Танкадо оставил нам только один выход-признать существование ТРАНСТЕКСТА. Такая возможность .

Если эта программа попадет на рынок, любой третьеклассник, имеющий модем, получит возможность отправлять зашифрованные сообщения, которые АНБ не сможет прочесть. Это означает конец нашей разведки. Но мысли Сьюзан были далеко от политических последствий создания Цифровой крепости.

Еще. На пальцах ничего. Резким движением Халохот развернул безжизненное тело и вскрикнул от ужаса. Перед ним был не Дэвид Беккер. Рафаэль де ла Маза, банкир из пригорода Севильи, скончался почти мгновенно.

Multicultural education

Строя свои планы, Стратмор целиком полагался на собственный компьютер. Как и многие другие сотрудники АНБ, он использовал разработанную агентством программу Мозговой штурм - безопасный способ разыгрывать сценарий типа Что, если?. на защищенном от проникновения компьютере.

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Alex64666 16.05.2021 at 20:32

Prudence L.

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